What Is a Reformed Christian? — The New Geneva

by Tony and Angela If you ask a “Reformed” Christian what a “Reformed” Christian is you’re bound to get a different answer with each person. I went to the definitive answer of all truth and asked her, “Hey Siri, what’s a Reformed Christian?” She replied, “Calvinism.” Angela and I put this question out to […]

via What Is a Reformed Christian? — The New Geneva

The Early Church on Homosexuality

The Reformed Reader

The Ante-Nicene Fathers, 10 vols.   -              Edited By: Alexander Roberts      In the days of the early church – I’m thinking specifically of the 2nd century – Christian apologists had to defend the faith against false charges, accusations, and misrepresentations.  One such apologist, Athenagoras (d. 200 AD?), wrote a booklet to Roman rulers called A Plea for the Christians.   This apology by Athenagoras is still quite relevant today because it discusses things we still talk about today.  I’ll come back to this booklet later, but for now I want to point out what this 2nd century Christian apologist said about sexual immorality and homosexuality.

Athenagoras refuted the claim or accusation that Christians were very sexually impure compared to non-Christian Roman citizens.  He said Christian spouses – man and wife – were committed to one another and instructed to avoid and detest adultery while the same could not be said of the Romans.  He also argued that Christians…

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July 4: True Freedom in Christ Alone! — This Day in Presbyterian History

Happy Independence Day by Rev. David T. Myers On this Independence Day, we reflect on what freedom means to us as Christian Presbyterians. Among all the benefits which we enjoy as Christian citizens, chief among which should be the freedom to worship God according to the dictates of our conscience as regulated by His Word, the…

via July 4: True Freedom in Christ Alone! — This Day in Presbyterian History

“What the Arminian wants to do is to arouse man’s activity: what we want to do is to kill it once for all—to show him that he is lost and ruined, and that his activities are not now at all equal to the work of conversion; that he must look upward. They seek to make the man stand up: we seek to bring him down, and make him feel that there he lies in the hand of God, and that his business is to submit himself to God, and cry aloud, ‘Lord, save, or we perish.’ We hold that man is never so near grace as when he begins to feel he can do nothing at all. When he says, ‘I can pray, I can believe, I can do this, and I can do the other,’ marks of self-sufficiency and arrogance are on his brow.”

C. H. Spurgeon